Dead Hearing Aids

We have people all the time ask a few questions:  How do I know if my hearing aids are working correctly?  One way is to make sure that the batteries are fresh.  Buying at Walmart or Walgreens (while convenient) is not the best idea.  Their batteries are on the shelf for six months to a year, you have no idea how long.  Our batteries are less expensive than theirs and also are only in our cabinet for one month.  That’s right, only a month.  We only order what we need then get new ones.

Another part to consider is that when one has the newer type hearing aids, they might have filters that are plugged up.  In the past, we allowed the wax to go right down the tubing of any style hearing aid teaching the patient to clear it with good cleaning techniques.  The manufacturers then followed suit by adding these little filters to prevent wax from going too deeply in the device.  That might be a problem in hearing aids.

Lastly, if those two don’t work, seek your Audiologist’s advice about what might be wrong with the unit.  It could need an In Warranty repair or an Out of Warranty repair.  I have patients that will argue with me about why manufacturers don’t always repair older hearing aids.  Nothing that is old is always repaired.  My dad searched high and low to find a dashboard for a 1966 Ford Bronco only to find he couldn’t…try to get a really old computer repaired and you will understand what we are saying.  Over five year old aids can have some of the same troubles in repairing them.  The manufacturers don’t make the circuitry anymore.  There are, what we call, “Chop Shops” online or sent by your hearing aid dealer to low quality manufacturers who will do old hearing aid repairs but most patients have difficulty after the repair occurs because they changed out the circuit and it doesn’t match your hearing needs anymore.  That happens on electronics of any type that they don’t make anymore.  Seek a good Audiologist’s opinion about how to address your needs in hearing aid repairs.